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My Laptop
3-6
YEARS

My Laptop

£21.99
Temporarily unavailable to purchase online,
for more information please call 03306780149

Developmental Benefits

Language Development
Language Development
Science Concepts
Science Concepts
Hand Eye Coordination
Hand Eye Coordination
Basic Maths Skills
Basic Maths Skills
Visualisation Memory
Visualisation Memory

Developmental Benefits

My Laptop

Language Development
  • Introduces the alphabet, letter sounds and vocabulary.
  • Babies start to babble at an early age and this can be seen as the first signs of language. They are predisposed to pick up the sounds of the language that they hear around them. Adults can facilitate babies’ language development by playing with them, focussing on particular toys, reading books and naming everyday objects. The more babies are exposed to language the faster they will begin to pick up it up. There are social skills involved in language acquisition such as realising that it is necessary to wait until the other person has finished speaking. Babies begin to learn about conversational turn-taking from an early age; if a baby is babbling the adult waits for a pause and then talks to the baby. Babies learn to take turns even before they are using words. Social interaction is important for language development and turn-taking games are a fun and educational way for babies and young children to learn.
    Young children also need to practice their language skills. Toys that name alphabet letters and everyday words satisfy young children’s need for repetition and rehearsal when practicing words and sounds. For instance, young children can press a button repetitively to hear the same sound or word again. Babies and children learn a lot through repetition and pick up words rapidly in this way. Once children begin to read their vocabulary expands enormously.
Science Concepts
  • Exploration of various environments & associated vocabulary.
  • Children are sometimes referred to as intuitive physicists, biologists and even psychologists. This means that children may naturally understand something about how the world around them works. Infants are beginning to understand about physical objects and their effects upon one another. They also learn a great deal about the world around them by repeating actions that have an effect. For instance, infants demonstrate their understanding of ‘object permanence’ when they pull away a blanket to reveal a toy that has previously been hidden from view. Young children continue to build knowledge of their world by acting on the environment around them.
    As children’s skills mature and develop they can learn about science related words and expand their vocabulary. Young children demonstrate their biological knowledge when they make the distinction between animate beings such as animals and inanimate objects. Children use inanimate objects such as toy animals or pictures of animals to learn more about an animal’s diet, behaviour and habitat. From an early age children can understand the difference between a living thing such as a cat and a model or toy cat. Toys can engage children in thinking about scientific inventions, details of the animal kingdom, environmental information and facts whilst also expanding their science vocabulary. Scientific knowledge can then be reinforced through fun games and quizzes.
Hand Eye Coordination
  • Aiming and concentrating on a target improves hand/eye coordination.
  • Humans have highly developed manual dexterity skills that distinguish them from any other species on this planet. This manual dexterity emerges during the infant’s first year and, with plenty of opportunities to manipulate and play with toys and objects, becomes a highly tuned ability. Babies will reach and grasp for objects in an uncoordinated manner from an early age. As they begin to gain control over their movements infants succeed in reaching for and grasping toys. The first attempts by babies to grasp toys in their hands involve using the palm of their hand with all their fingers around the object. As development occurs through physical maturation and plenty of opportunities to play with toys, grasping becomes more sophisticated. The use of the opposable thumb and index finger allows infants to pick up very small objects in what is termed a ‘pincer grasp’. This finely tuned motor skill emerges at the end of first year of life.
    The development of hand and eye coordination skills continues throughout childhood where opportunities to play games that require children to manoeuvre objects, build tall towers or hit targets on a computer screen facilitate the development of finely-tuned hand and eye coordination.
Basic Maths Skills
  • Develops counting and number identification.
  • Even young babies can discriminate between a small set of objects and a large set of objects. Young children learn to match their culture’s number words and symbols (e.g. 1, 2, and 3) to specific quantities. Research has shown that maths skills can improve with practice; young children who are given plenty of opportunity to work and play with numbers and counting will improve their basic maths skills. Counting rhymes are very popular with babies and young children and teach them basic maths concepts in a fun way. A young child may make mistakes when learning to count (e.g. missing out the number 6 when counting 10 bricks). But this young child is still demonstrating the basic maths ability; linking number words to actual numbers, realising that each item can only have one number word, and that the numbers have a sequence. Number games, learning about sequences and singing counting rhymes all help to enhance children’s basic maths skills.
    Repetition is also important, for instance, singing counting rhymes over and over again gets babies used to number words and their sequence. Toys that count as babies, for instance, place bricks in a slot and computer games that present children with fun maths problems are also useful learning tools. Play and practice with numbers is fun for babies and is essential for the development of young children’s understanding of quantity.
Visualisation Memory
  • Engaging graphics & visualisation activities develop memory.
  • As babies develop they begin to use mental pictures of objects that are no longer within their field of vision. These memory skills can be enhanced through presenting visual stimuli more than once; repetition is essential for the development of memory skills. Young infants’ memories are influenced by context; for instance, they can imitate an adult’s actions with a toy but only if the toy is identical in colour and features to the one that the adult played with. Older infants can remember, for instance, how to press a toy animal to make a sound even if the toy is slightly different to the one which the adult used to demonstrate. Infants’ memories become less context dependent at the same time that infants start to crawl and walk. Giving babies plenty of opportunity to explore their world allows them to enhance their memory skills.
    As children’s attention span increases so do their memory strategies. This means that children can use deliberate mental activities, such as visualisation, to increase the chances of retaining information in working memory and then shifting it to their long-term knowledge base. Lots of rehearsal and organisation is needed to use memory to its full advantage; repetition is an important part of both infant and childhood learning. Children can both learn and practice memory strategies using toys and games. Toys that encourage children to remember visual stimuli, answer questions and then repeat the activity over again enhance learning.
  • Pre-school laptop with child-friendly 4-directional mouse and 30 fun and educational activities.
  • Teaches age appropriate curriculum including phonics, counting and spelling.
  • Features 5 progressive learning categories Letters & Words, Numbers & Shapes, Animals & Foods, Logic & Games and Music Time.
  • Customise the laptop with child’s name, age and favourite food in the All About Me Mode.
  • Encourages logical thinking, visualisation skills and hand-eye co-ordination.
Best for ages:
3 to 6 Years
Highlights
Pre-school laptop with child-friendly 4-directional mouse and 30 fun and educational activities that teach age appropriate curriculum. Includes customisation mode.
Description
Pre-school laptop with child-friendly 4-directional mouse and 30 fun and educational activities that teach early computer skills and age appropriate curriculum including phonics, counting and spelling. Features 5 progressive learning categories Letters & Words, Numbers & Shapes, Animals & Foods, Logic & Games and Music Time. You can also customise your child’s experience by entering their name, age and favourite food in the All About Me Mode, also create a personal avatar, choose a screen wallpaper and opening tune! Friendly penguin character leads and encourages play as a helper and friend. Encourages logical thinking, visualisation skills and hand-eye co-ordination.
  • Product Number: 80-155403
  • AA Batteries Required

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